Wednesday, April 18, 2012

The Ho Chi Minh Trail

The Ho Chi Minh Trail was an elaborate system of mountain and jungle trails linking North Vietnam, South Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos during the Vietnam War against the United States. Today, the many paths of the Ho Chi Minh trail criss-cross the newly built Ho Chi Minh Highway. On this tour we explore the northern section of the Ho Chi Minh trail, which was previously inaccessible, from Ngoc Lac to the Hai Van Pass in Danang. This wide, smooth undulating highway is a bikers dream as there is little traffic on the road. And it conveniently will take us through farms, orchards, tribal villages and offers us easy access to some of the country's top attractions — one of Vietnam’s most spectacular caves, the ancient royal seat of Hue, the picturesque trading port of Hoi An and South China Sea beaches.


  1. Fartun, how much bombing did the US do to stop the supplies?

  2. The United States could not block the Ho Chi Minh Trail with ground forces, because the countries it passed through were officially neutral. Extensive aerial bombing did not prevent the North Vietnamese from moving hundreds of tons of war supplies per day down the Ho Chi Minh Trail to the south. The trail undeniably lay at the heart of the war. For the Vietnamese of the North the Ho Chi Minh Trail symbolized the aspirations of a people — hiking it became the central experience of a generation.

    On November 11, 1968, Operation Commando Hunt was initiated by the U.S. and its allies. The goal of the operation was to interdict men and supplies on the Ho Chi Minh trail, through Laos into South Vietnam. By the end of the operation, three million tons of bombs were dropped on Laos, which slowed but did not consistently disrupt trail operations


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